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Book Review: ‘The Slenderman Mysteries’ by Nick Redfern

Book Review: ‘The Slenderman Mysteries’ by Nick Redfern
Subtitled “An Internet Urban Legend Comes to Life”
New Page Books, 2018
ISBN 978-1-63265-112-9
$15.99/£13.99

This book about Slenderman contains a great deal on synchronicities. Perhaps it shouldn’t be considered too weird, then, that I picked it up literally just after having watched the X-Files episode entitled ‘Ghouli’. The cult TV episode opens with two teenage girls attacking one another, each believing the other is a multi-limbed monster. Scully looks up Creepypasta on the Internet. Mulder wonders where it’s all going.

I talk about a synchronicity here because the plot device used in this X-Files episode shares themes with a horrifying, real-life crime that occurred in Waukesha, Milwaukee on 31st May 2014. In this shocking case, two children attempted to murder a friend of theirs by stabbing her in some local woods. The two (now convicted) girls appear to have been drawn into a very dark psychological space, involving an Internet phenomenon known as the Slenderman. Fortunately, the victim of the attack survived, although she is left with deep psychological scars. The motive for the frenzied attack remains anything but clear, but the young perpetrators have been sentenced to long stretches in psychiatric institutes.

Slenderman started as a creative meme uploaded to the Creepypasta website by Erik Knudsen, in 2009. His sinister depiction of a tall, pale and faceless man seemed to resonate with many of the website’s fans, and the spooky meme went viral. Redfern charts the genesis of this Internet phenomenon, and draws parallels between Slenderman and other, similar ‘creatures’ from paranormal studies and folklore: The Men-in-Black, the Mothman, the Mad Gasser of Mattoon, the ‘Tall Man’ legend of indigenous American cultures, and various German legends about a Grossmann. The author considers the possibility that the Slenderman is the modern depiction of an old archetype drawn from within the collective unconscious. The perceived (actually, made up) characteristics of this creature involve a sinister, faceless man who lures children into his lair in the woods, to a dark angel, whose array of dark tentacles and elongated limbs can resemble wings; like the Mothman’s. You don’t get the sense that any good will come of any of this.  Read More…

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Book review: ‘Immortality of the Gods’ by Nick Redfern

Subtitled “Legends, Mysteries, and the Alien Connection to Eternal Life”

New Page Books, 2017

ISBN 978-1-63265-075-7

$16.99/£13.99

Is it so ridiculous to imagine that our ancestors were visited by hyper-advanced beings from space?  It would be entirely natural for them to consider such beings to be gods.  It’s not just the ‘magical’ technology on view, their level of knowledge, or their awe-inspiring presence.  Perhaps these visitors were indeed effectively immortal.  In the last decade or so, futurists have begun to seriously consider a world where aging is eradicated – or at least seriously curtailed.  Gene therapy, cloning, stem cell research, advances in medicine – potentially a potent brew of treatments which might, together, offer a fabled fountain of youth to Humanity. 

As Nick Redfern argues in his latest book about the ancient gods and their alien connection, if interstellar space-farers were just a few centuries more advanced technologically than us, then it is quite reasonable to imagine that they had already cracked aging.  Indeed, one might even add that extending lifetimes considerably would be a mandatory requirement to interstellar exploration, given the timescales involved.  In other words, the very presence of spacecraft in our ancient skies millennia ago implies that the pilots are effectively immortal. 

But … we’re jumping ahead of ourselves.  Firstly, what of the evidence for such a contentious claim?

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