Dark Star Symbolism in the Zohar

Last month, I discussed the assumed orbital period of Nibiru, 3600 years, and how Zecharia Sitchin may have arrived at that figure (1).  This included a description of a journey to ‘Olam’ through seven heavens of 500 years each mentioned in a conversation between a heretic and the Jewish savant Rabbi Gamliel.  Sitchin may have been influenced by this Hebrew text when he considered the likely orbital period of Nibiru/Marduk, a Planet X body which he described from his reading and interpretation of various ancient Sumerian texts (2).

Read More…

  • 1

Winged Disk Imagery at The Pantheon

While I was in Rome with Mrs DarkStar, I took the opportunity to visit many of the wonderful sights that this ancient city has to offer.  As you might appreciate, I’m always on the look out for the kind of symbolism that might be associated with the Dark Star.  In the pantheon, I spotted this rather ornate fresco, resplendent with star-filled crosses, and a number of winged star symbols.  This series of astronomical symbols lies behind a pair of pillars, each one of which is topped with a star of its own.  There is thus, pretty clearly, an archaeo-astronomical theme to this series of motifs.

Read More…

  • 0

Was Sitchin right about 3600?

The figure of 3600 is a core component of the late Zecharia Sitchin’s vision and argument for the properties of his Planet X body, Nibiru. The number 3,600 stems from the unusual sexagesimal numbering system used by the Sumerians (1), and was known to them as the sar, or shar in Akkadian.  I’ve often wondered why Sitchin decided on this number for the orbital period of Nibiru.  Sitchin carefully thought things through before committing his ideas to paper, and such a central tenet of his work had to have something more behind it than an arbitrary choice from a series of important sexagesimal numbers.  Aspects of his writings that mesh with this number pertain to:

Read More…

  • 1

Planet Nine Constellations Predicted by Sitchin, and IRAS

A week on from Caltech’s announcement, Dr Mike Brown and Dr Konstantin Batygin, the two astrophysicists proposing the existence of their ‘Planet Nine’, sketched out the range of orbits which their object might be moving through, including its all-important approximate perihelion and aphelion positions.  Essentially, Brown and Batygin consider the perihelion position of the Planet Nine body to be in a broad region around the zodiacal constellations Scorpius/Sagittarius (R.A. = ~16hrs), whilst the aphelion positionof Planet Nine is likely in the equally broad Orion/Taurus area (R.A. = ~4hrs) (1,2).

caltech_position_planet9

Image credit:  Caltech

Read More…

  • 0